Workshop Report – Aysgarth Falls March 2017

Posted by on March 13, 2017

As if by magic, time has mysteriously disappeared and 2017 is here!! and our SEVENTH year running the Natural Light Photography workshops has begun! and what a way to kick off the season.

Photographers in a line at Lower Aysgarth Falls

Photographers in a line at Lower Aysgarth Falls

Our first trip out took us out to Aysgarth Falls and the weather on the drive over the Dales was looking very promising to capture long exposures of the fast moving water. I say fast moving as we had some rainfall through the week, so the falls were looking rather healthy.

The group gathered at The Fox and Hounds in West Burton for teas and coffees whilst myself and Mark went through the exposure settings on the camera and a slideshow detailing the five elements that make a great landscape photograph. Setting out we cross the fields up towards Aysgarth and take a first stop at a field barn. The clouds behind were reasonably dark so would make for some nice black and white images. This was a good stop to make sure all the settings on the camera were good including white balance and ISO speeds.

Capturing the Lower Aysgarth Falls

Capturing the Lower Aysgarth Falls

Moving on, we climb the small hill and drop down to the famous Aysgarth Falls. First off we make our way to the Lower Falls which, due to the recent rainfall, were nice and full. The overcast weather made for longer exposures possible, but with little detail in the sky it was more interesting to photograph the smaller details in the falls.

Photographers in a line at Lower Aysgarth Falls

Photographers in a line at Lower Aysgarth Falls

The top of Lower Falls has a fierce section where the river narrows and water rushes over. Not so easy to talk over but makes for a fantastic subject.

MS-2349

With lunchtime left rather late we head back up to the Upper Asygarth for a bite to eat before looking how to capture the famous falls. The drizzle started a little but doesn’t stop play and the umbrellas are brought out. The river here is very wide, so there is more details in the falls to capture.

MS-2346

Moving away from the falls for a brief moment, we take a quick stop in a small section of woodland and with the cameras off the tripod have some fun with intentional camera movement. Slowing the shutter speed down a little we take images whilst sweeping the camera in a downward motion and paint with light. As a group we look quite crazy waving the cameras around, but the results are superb.

With the cameras off the tripods, we have a go at some intentional camera movement

With the cameras off the tripods, we have a go at some intentional camera movement

After one last stop at the lower falls, we head back towards West Burton. Stopping at the viewpoint where three field barns line up into the distance, its a great stop with the intention to produce some letterbox crops. The sky was getting darker and little detail in it, however the foreground grasses were very colourful.

Lastly we arrive at West Burton Falls, otherwise know as Cauldron Falls, named after its round, bowl shape. The river level was reasonably high, which left lots of details all around. Getting nearer sunset, it slowly darkened down which allowed for some very long exposures and the perfect end to a great day.

At Cauldron Falls towards sunset

At Cauldron Falls towards sunset

The next day we met up in Harrogate for the post processing session, to have a look at the images on the big screen. Demonstrating the workflow using Lightroom and Photoshop we saw some superb images from the day!

If you would like to join us on a workshop to Aysgarth Falls, Click Here for more information.

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